Release Cadence: You’re Not Agile If You’re Not Shipping

I’ve spent the last 3 years exploring the in’s and out’s of different Agile frameworks and methodologies.  I’ve worked with large commercial firms, government contractors, and small ISVs to adopt one set of Agile practices or another.

In the beginning things are generally amazing.  There’s a new level of transparency, excitement and shared motivation.  At some point, though, the question always comes up: Are we ready to ship?

This is the moment where organizations either head down the Scrum-erfall path or learn what Agile was meant to be:

…satisfy the customer
through early and continuous delivery
of valuable software.

The Path to Scrum-erfall

Unfortunately, too many organizations have taken hold of the rules and ceremonies of Kanban, Scrum, XP, and the rest, but ignore these two principles:

  • Working software is the primary measure of progress.
  • Deliver working software frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with a
    preference to the shorter timescale.

Does Shipping Heal All Wounds?

On March 4th, I opened what I hope will replace the State of Agile report: Release Cadence Report.

logo-verticalThis survey and publication was created to refocus our industries attention back on shipping software frequently to the delight and benefit of our customers, team members, and companies.  It is an attempt to relieve our software developers of ineffective anecdotal stories of Facebook and Flickr shipping dozens of times per day.  Instead I want you to have the evidence to take to leaders in your organization so that you can have a serious conversation about the implications of release cadence.

Please take 10 minutes and complete this survey and you will receive an early copy of the report.

Take the Survey

You can also get yourself or your organization listed as being part of this movement by referring your coworkers, peers, friend.  Sign up here and be a part of bringing shipping back to Agile.